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Keynote Lectures

Past and Future of Physiological Computing and Creativity - An Underexplored and Promising Territory
Sergi Jorda, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain

Emotions-Action Representation-Music Liking and EEG - An Advanced Signal Processing Perspective Towards Innovative Human Assistive Technology
Leontios Hadjileontiadis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

The Interplay of Biocybernetic Adaptation and Biofeedback Training
Alan Pope, NASA, Retired, Distinguished Research Associate, United States

 

Past and Future of Physiological Computing and Creativity - An Underexplored and Promising Territory

Sergi Jorda
Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Sergi Jordà holds a B.S. in Fundamental Physics (1986) and a PhD in Computer Science and Digital Communication (2005). He is a researcher in the Music Technology Group of Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, and an associate professor in the same university, where he teaches computer music, Human Computer Interaction (HCI), and interactive media arts. His main research interests are in the confluence of HCI and tangible and musical interaction, and augmented communication using tabletops and brain computer interfaces. He has authored more than 20 articles in journals and book chapters, more than 60 peer-reviewed conference papers, as well as given more than 20 invited presentations and keynote talks. He has been program chair for several international conferences, and conference chair for the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI'13) that took place in Barcelona in 2013, being also member of the TEI steering committee. He has received several international awards, including the prestigious Prix Ars Electronica Golden Nica. He is currently best known as one of the inventors of the Reactable, a tabletop musical instrument that accomplished mass popularity after being integrated in Icelandic artist Bjork’s last world tour, and he is one of the founding partners of the spin-off company Reactable Systems. He has participated in 6 founded projects both from the EC and the Spanish government, and he is currently the IP of the STREP project 'GiantSteps' (FP7-610591).


Abstract
We humans are highly expressive beings, and not only with respect to language; non-verbal communication has and will forever play an essential role in all human relationships. It is theorized that the human sclera, the "white of the eye", is unique in the animal kingdom in that it is visible whenever the eye is open. It has evolved to be this way because of our social nature, making it easier for one individual to infer where another one is looking, increasing the efficacy of this form of non-verbal communication and turning the eye from a sensory organ into a powerful communication tool. Beyond the eyes, our whole human body is a major source for non-verbal expressiveness, both conscious and unconscious. We humans are also highly creative beings. We have created language, music, art... and technology - and the technology we invent advances very quickly. Raw processing power increases at exponential rhythms reaching consumers with minimal delay, as desktop computers and console devices considered state-of-the-art five years ago are being outstripped by today's pocket-sized mobile devices. However, most current human-computer interfaces continue to constitute an exasperating bottleneck for human expressiveness, lacking context- awareness, and the richness and nuances of non-verbal communication. In this lecture we will first overview the history of HCI from a creative and artistic perspective, from the 1960s until our days, with a special focus on music and on BCIs and other physiological interfaces that may help complementing explicit behaviour with implicit information such as mental and physiological states of the human body. We will then slow down at this last decade, when a first generation of products for capturing body movement and brain-state (from the Nintendo Wii-mote, to more recent low-cost BCIs and controllers such as Leap Motion or MYO) have entered the consumer marketplace, proving a thirst for multimodal expressive interfaces, and a clear desire amongst end users to interact with creative multimedia systems in seamless ways. However, many may argue that the experience for many users is still frustrating. We will thus conclude by exploring why “natural interaction” has not yet met our expectations and what kind of technologies may be needed for the next generation of multimodal interactive and expressive interfaces.



 

 

Emotions-Action Representation-Music Liking and EEG - An Advanced Signal Processing Perspective Towards Innovative Human Assistive Technology

Leontios Hadjileontiadis
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Greece
 

Brief Bio
Leontios Hadjileontiadis received the Diploma degree in Electrical Engineering in 1989 and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1997, both from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), Thessaloniki, Greece. He also holds a Diploma in Musicology (AUTH, Thessaloniki, 2011) and a Ph.D. degree in music composition (University of York, UK, 2004). Since December 1999 he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, AUTH, Greece as a faculty member. He is also a Professor in composition at the State Conservatory of Thessaloniki, Greece. He was the recipient of eight international awards with the latest being the Faculty Champion Award 2012 from Microsoft. His research interests are in higher-order statistics, alpha-stable distributions, higher-order zero crossings, wavelets, polyspectra, fractals, neuro-fuzzy modeling for medical, mobile and digital signal processing applications. He was adviser of 5 doctoral dissertations, published 78 papers in peer reviewed international journals and more than 120 papers in peer reviewed international conference proceedings, 3 books, and 8 book chapters.


Abstract
The proposed lecture will present advanced achievements in the field of affective computing towards more enhanced human-computer-interaction interfaces, presenting advanced signal processing techniques and implementations applied to Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In particular, the way emotions are 'reflected' in our brain signals, the way actions (both in explicit and implicit way, e.g., gestures in music) are combined with internal representations in our brain (involving mirror neuron system activation), and how our brain decides if it likes or not the perceived music will be presented and discussed. Moreover, potential implementations of the findings in the field of human assistive technology will be shown, including innovative ways of pain management and Alzheimer's community support.



 

 

The Interplay of Biocybernetic Adaptation and Biofeedback Training

Alan Pope
NASA, Retired, Distinguished Research Associate
United States
 

Brief Bio
Alan Pope is an engineer and psychologist who has been conducting Manned Systems Engineering research as a Research Scientist at NASA Langley Research Center since 1980. Dr. Pope’s research is aimed at developing human response measurement technologies to assess the effects of advanced crewstation concepts on the crew's ability to perform flight management tasks effectively.  He originated the scientific study of hazardous awareness states in monitoring environments and physiologically-based adaptive automation, and co-invented the 2014-patented NASA LaRC MindShift technology. Since 1995, he has conducted research and published journal articles and book chapters developing his concept of biocybernetic adaptation. Dr. Pope is inventor of over 25 inventions and holds 9 U.S. patents in the fields of physiologically modulated simulations, virtual reality and games, and aviation synthetic vision systems. He was awarded the 1998 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Contribution to Society Award, the 2000 NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, the DARPA 2006 Foundations of Augmented Cognition Award, the 2012 NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the 2013 NASA Langley Technology Transfer Mentor of the Year Award. Dr. Pope holds an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee (1969) and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Florida (1975). In 1988, he co-founded the Behavioral Medicine Institute in Virginia, U.S., and engaged in clinical practice there until 2001. Dr. Pope was elected to serve on the Board of Directors, Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 2010 – 2012. He has served as adjunct faculty at three Virginia universities and has served as Adjunct Research Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Eastern Virginia Medical School since 1995.


Abstract
A particular form of physiological computing research and technology has resulted from the cycling of concepts and models from clinical biofeedback practice into adaptive automation research and back again into biofeedback training spin-offs. Inspired by a U.S. Air Force “symbionic cockpit” concept and informed by the practice of biofeedback training, a biocybernetic system developed at NASA Langley Research Center demonstrated the operation of psychophysiologically adaptive automation systems. The biocybernetic system was based upon a closed-loop concept that involved adjusting or modulating (cybernetic, for governing) a person’s task environment based upon that person’s psychophysiological responses (bio-). Of the four applications of the closed-loop system design introduced in this presentation, two will receive special attention. One application of biocybernetic adaptation, adaptive automation, is aimed at maintaining operator state effective for the extant human-machine operational context. A second application of biocybernetic adaptation, termed physiological modulation, is designed to develop physiological self-regulation skill. Several gaming embodiments of a psychophysiological self-regulation training system based on biocybernetic adaptation will be described that offer certain advantages for biofeedback training, but also raise challenging issues.



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