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Keynote Lectures

Physiological Computing for Outdoor Activities
António Câmara, YDreams, Portugal

Hybrid Brain-Computer Communication
Gernot Müller-Putz, Graz University of Technology, Austria

A Tiny Laboratory under the Skin
Sandro Carrara, EPFL, Switzerland

Towards a Safer and More Healing Environment in Hospitals
Thomas Falck, Philips Research, Netherlands

 

Physiological Computing for Outdoor Activities

António Câmara
YDreams
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
António Câmara is Chief Executive Officer of YDreams and Professor at Universidade Nova de Lisboa. He got a BSc in Civil Engineering at IST (1977) and MSc (1979) and PhD (1982) in Environmental Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech. António Câmara was a Post-Doctoral Associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Visiting Professor at Cornell University (1988-89) and MIT (1998-99). António Câmara has been a pioneer on geographical information systems research. He published over 150 refereed papers and the "Spatial Multimedia and Virtual Reality" published by Taylor & Francis (1999) and "Environmental Systems" published by Oxford University Press (2002). He is a founder of YDreams, a international leader in interactivity. YDreams has developed more than 600 projects in 25 countries for companies such as Nike, Adidas, Santander, Coca-Cola, NOKIA and Vodafone. The company has received over twenty awards including the Industrial Design Society of America Gold Award for Interactive Environments in 2004, and the Auggies, Augmented Reality's Oscar, in 2010. YDreams projects and products have been profiled in the New York Times, Guardian, Liberation, El Pais, Business Week, Economist, Wired, Engadaget, Gizmodo, CNN and CNBC. António Câmara has received several national and international awards, namely Premio Pessoa in 2006.


Abstract
Physiological computing for outdoor activities may involve data collection from sensors, local actuators, a communications infra structure, and processing. User interface design is mostly centered on sensor, sensor-actuator, and computing devices, both mobile and fixed. For illustrative purposes two case studies are presented: the development of an infrastructure for firemen; and the application of physiological computing to football.



 

 

Hybrid Brain-Computer Communication

Gernot Müller-Putz
Graz University of Technology
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Gernot Müller-Putz is Head of the Institute for Knowledge Discovery, Graz University of Technology, Austria. He is also Head of the Laboratory for Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI Lab) at Graz University of Technology. In 2004 he received his PhD in electrical engineering ('New Concepts in Brain-Computer Communication Use of Steady-State Somatosensory Evoked Potentials, User Training by Telesupport and Control of Functional Electrical Stimulation') from Graz University of Technology, where, beginning in 2000, he worked on non-invasive electroencephalogram-based (EEG) brain-computer interfacing (BCI) for the control of neuroprosthetic devices. In 2008 he recieved his "venia docendi" for medical informatics ('Towards EEG-based Control of Neuroprosthetic Devices') at the faculty of computer sciende at Graz University of Technology. His research interest include EEG-based neuroprosthesis control, hybrid BCI systems, the human somatosensory system and assistive technology.


Abstract
Persons with movement disabilities can use a wide range of assistive devices. The set of assistive devices ranges from simple switches connected to a remote controller to complex sensors attached to a computer and to eye tracking systems. All of these systems work very well after being adjusted individually for each person. However, there are still situations where the systems do not work properly, e.g., when residual muscles become fatigued or users have such severe disabilities that no movement is possible. In such situations, a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) might be the only available option, since it uses brain signals (usually the electroencephalogram, EEG) for control without requiring any movement whatsoever. BCIs are systems that establish a direct connection between the human brain and a computer, thus providing an additional communication channel. As noted, some people use a BCI because their disabilities make it impossible to use any interface requiring movement. BCIs can also be used to control neuroprostheses in patients suffering from a high spinal cord injury. After more than 20 years of research and development, Brain-Computer Interface technology is ready to leave the lab and to be used in practical applications in real world settings such as homes or hospitals. A BCI could replace an existing assistive device, however, it would be even better to couple the BCI with the assistive device creating a new system called a hybrid BCI (hBCI). Ideally, an hBCI should let the user extend the types of inputs available to an assistive technology, or choose not to use the BCI at all. The hBCI might decide which input channel(s) offer(s) the most reliable signal(s) and switch between input channels to improve information transfer rate, usability, or other factors, or could instead fuse various input channels. The talk gives a review of BCIs and hybrid BCIs for the use in disabled people and discusses future directions.



 

 

A Tiny Laboratory under the Skin

Sandro Carrara
EPFL
Switzerland
 

Brief Bio
Sandro Carrara is a lecturer and scientist at the EPFL in Lausanne (Switzerland). He is former professor of optical and electrical biosensors at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Biophysics (DIBE) of the University of Genoa (Italy) and former professor of nanobiotechnology at the University of Bologna (Italy). He is founder and Editor-in-Chief of the journal BioNanoScience by Springer, Topical Editor of the IEEE Sensors Journal, and Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems. He is an IEEE member for the Circuit and System Society (CASS) and member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Sensors Council. He also has been recently appointed as CASS Distinguished Lecturers for the years 2013-2014. His scientific interests are on electrical phenomena of nano-bio-structured films, and include CMOS design of biochips based on proteins and DNA. He has more then 130 scientific publications and 10 patents. His work received a NATO Advanced Research Award in 1996 for the original contribution to the physics of single-electron conductivity in nano-particles, two Best Paper Awards at the IEEE PRIME Conference in 2010 (Berlin), and in 2009 (Cork), a Best Poster Award at the Nanotera workshop in 2011 (Bern), and a Best Poster Award at the NanoEurope Symposium in 2009 (Rapperswil). He also received the Best Referees Award from the journal Biosensor and Bioelectronics in 2006. He has been appointed as General Chairman of IEEE International Conference BioCAS 2014, that will be held in October 2014 in the new EPFL Conference Center.


Abstract
The development of Integrated electrochemical CMOS-Bio-Sensors [1] for diagnosis and/or treatment of patients with specific physiological conditions (e.g., heart, cardiovascular, cancer diseases) or convalescents is a key factor to provide better, more rationale, effective and ultimately low-cost health care also at home. The ultimate goal of improved health care on those subjects is the extension of the patients’ autonomy, the possibility for auto-monitoring, the improvement of their comfort levels and their integration into everyday life. On-line monitoring is also required in professionals and recreational sportsmen training, as well as in elderly and/or disabled citizen care and/or people involved in public utilities (e.g. the public-transportation drivers). For those, it is a key aspect the maintenance of their safety by through embedded systems to alert emergency services in the event of a potentially dangerous situation. Some systems for on-line monitoring are available in the market. They use wearable devices (accelerometers, heartbeat monitoring system, etc). However, all these systems do not measure the human metabolism at molecular level (metabolites). The only available real-time, implantable/wearable systems for metabolic control are limited to glucose monitoring and used only for diabetic patients. However, electrochemical sensors may address so many other molecules, which have crucial relevance in human metabolism of chronic patients. So far, there are no available integrated nano-bio-systems for multi-metabolites, real-time, remote monitoring of the human metabolism. Thus, the aim of this keynote speech is to present innovative concepts for multi-panel, highly integrated, fully implantable, remotely powered and real-time monitoring systems for human metabolism at molecular level. The core of the presented system is an extremely integrated implantable chip that can be seen as a tiny molecular laboratory located under the patient’s skin for providing molecular telemetry. The considered metabolic molecules are glucose, lactate, glutamate, ATP [2], and anticancer drugs as well as anti-inflammatory ones [3]. In case of drugs, the specificity of electrochemical sensors is improved at system level [4]. The proposed nanotechnology is based on carbon nanotubes to improve the sensors performance [3, 5]. To pursue the molecular detection, innovative VLSI solutions [6] are discussed including new ideas on the remote powering [7]. The new approach is obtained by integrating nano/bio/micro/CMOS/SW/RF systems in three devices: (i) a fully implantable sensors array for data acquisition (the tiny laboratory!); (ii) an on-skin intelligent-patch for remote powering and Bluetooth® connections; (iii) a mobile phone for data collection, elaboration, storage, and retransmission. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ [1] Sandro Carrara (Au), Bio/CMOS interfaces and co-design, Springer, New York, 2012 [2] Sandro Carrara, Léandre Bolomey, Cristina Boero, Andrea Cavallini, Eric Meurville, Giovanni De Micheli, Fabio Grassi, Tanja Rezzonico, Remote System for Monitoring Animal Models with Single-Metabolite Bio-Nano-Sensors, IEEE Sensors, 13(2013) 1018-1024 [3] Sandro Carrara, Andrea Cavallini, Victor Erokhin, Giovanni De Micheli, Multi-panel drugs detection in human serum for personalized therapy, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 26 (2011) 3914–3919 [4] Camilla Baj-Rossi, Giovanni De Micheli, Sandro Carrara, Electrochemical Detection of Anti-Breast-Cancer Agents in Human Serum by Cytochrome P450-Coated Carbon Nanotubes, Sensors 12 (2012) 6520-6537 [5] Cristina Boero, Sandro Carrara, Giovanna Del Vecchio, Laura Calzà, Giovanni De Micheli, Highly-Sensitive Carbon Nanotubes-Based Sensing for Glucose and Lactate Monitoring in Cell Culture, IEEE Transaction on Nanobiology, 10(2011) 59-67 [6] S. Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Irene Taurino, Sandro Carrara, and Giovanni De Micheli, A Current-Mode Potentiostat for Multi-Target Detection Tested with Different Lactate Biosensors, IEEE International Conference BioCAS 2012, 28-30 November 2012, Hsinchu, Taiwan, pp. 128 – 131 [7] Jacopo Olivo, Sandro Carrara, and Giovanni De Micheli, A study of Multi-Layer Spiral Inductors for Remote Powering of Implantable Sensors, IEEE Transaction of Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 2013, in press



 

 

Towards a Safer and More Healing Environment in Hospitals

Thomas Falck
Philips Research
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Thomas Falck is Principle Scientist of the Patient Care Solutions department at Philips Research in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. He studied computer science and graduated summa cum laude from RWTH Aachen University of Technology in Germany. Thomas is with Philips Research since 1992, starting first in Aachen working on connectivity solutions for business communications, consumer electronics and medical systems and in 2008 moving to the headquarter of Philips Research in Eindhoven. His research interests includes wireless body sensor networks, ubiquitous monitoring, and pervasive healthcare. Currently Thomas is active in the area of ambient healing environments with focus on critical care and delirium prevention and detection. Thomas serves as a member of the Steering Committee of the International Conference on Wearable and Implantable Body Sensor Networks and is on the Technical Program Committee of several conferences on communication technology for medical applications and acts as reviewer for leading biomedical journals. He is author of various papers, book chapters, and has more than 40 patents and patent applications.


Abstract
In the recent years patient safety, experience, and outcome is gaining more and more attention of healthcare providers and payers. We will give an overview on related activities within Philips Research. This includes a wireless solution for monitoring vital signs of patients in general wards that helps in early detection and intervention of patients at risk of deterioration. For this an early warning score is calculated for each patient based on the measured vital signs. A rapid response team is notified for effective intervention if early signs of deterioration are detected. To avoid the problem of alarm fatigue where caregivers are overwhelmed with a flood of non-actionable alarms, we investigated the effects of changing alarm limits. Furthermore we illustrate using delirium in critical care patients as an example how we try to create a more healing environment. To improve the sleep of patients we present a system that analyses the soundscape in real time to make caregivers aware when they are producing avoidable noise, thereby promoting behavioral change of staff. A healing lighting system helps patients to restore their circadian rhythm by what the risk of developing delirium is reduced. Finally we introduce our approach of using a video-based system for detecting delirium in a more automatic and continuous way.



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